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About Readability >> READABILITY FORMULAS
New Dale-Chall - Flesch Reading Ease - Flesch Grade Level - Fry Graph -Gunning FOG -
Powers-Sumner- Kearl - SMOG - FORCAST - Spache - Readability Software

The Fry Graph Readability Formula

Edward Fry developed one of the more popular Reading Formulas – the Fry Graph Readability Formula. Fry, who worked as a Fulbright Scholar in Uganda, also helped teachers to teach English as a Second Language (ESL) for a few years, from 1963 and onwards. During his early days, Fry developed readability tests based on graph [A Readability Formula That Saves Time, Journal of Reading (1968)]. This graph-based test determined readability through high school; it was validated with materials from primary and secondary schools and with results of other readability formulas.

** ( Use our Free Fry Graph Readability Calculator to grade your text using the Fry Graph)

In 1969, Fry extended the graph to primary levels. In his book Elementary Reading Instruction in 1977, Fry extended the graph to test through the college years. Fry advised that an individual’s vocabulary continues to grow during college years, yet the reading ability varies depending on the individual and the subjects taught.

Fry went on to become Director of the Reading Center of Rutgers University and an authority on how people learn to read.

The Fry Graph Readability Formula

Step 1: Select 3 samples of 100-word passages randomly (eliminate the numbers from word count).

Step 2: Count the number of sentences in all three 100-word passages, estimating the fraction of the last sentence to the nearest 1/10th.

Step 3: Count the number of syllables in all three 100-word passages. Make a table as follows:

  Number of Stentences Number of Syllables
 First 100 words    
 Second 100 words    
 Third 100 words    
 Total    
 Average    

Step 4: Enter the graph with Average Sentence Length and Number of Syllables. Plot dot where the two lines intersect. Area where dot is plotted signifies the approximate reading grade level of the content.

Step 5: If you find a great deal of variability, you can put more sample counts into the average.

The Fry Graph Readability Formula

Click image to see a larger version of the Fry Graph.

Scores that appear in the dark area (long sentences and long words) are invalid.

The Fry Graph Readability Formula and its associated Graph are often used to provide a consensus of readability for regulatory purposes, such as readability in the healthcare industry, to ensure a wider portion of the population can understand and access publications with a high level of readability.

** ( Use our Free Fry Graph Readability Calculator to grade your text using the Fry Graph)

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About Readability >> READABILITY FORMULAS
New Dale-Chall - Flesch Reading Ease - Flesch Grade Level - Fry Graph -Gunning FOG -
Powers-Sumner- Kearl - SMOG - FORCAST - Spache - Readability Software

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